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Member Firm Location
Agentis Legal Advocates & Advisors Coral Gables, Florida
Ball, Ball, Matthews & Novak, P.A. Montgomery, Alabama
Ball, Ball, Matthews & Novak, P.A. Mobile, Alabama
Barton LLP New York, New York
Christian & Small LLP Birmingham, Alabama
Coughlin & Gerhart, LLP Binghamton, New York
Degan, Blanchard & Nash, PLC Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Dillingham & Murphy, LLP San Francisco, California
Earp Cohn P.C. Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Earp Cohn P.C. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Elam & Burke Idaho
Elias, Meginnes & Seghetti, P.C. Peoria, Illinois
Fain, Major & Brennan, P.C. Atlanta, Georgia
Fogg Law Firm Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Foland, Wickens, Roper, Hofer & Crawford, P.C. Kansas City, Missouri
Goodman Allen Donnelly Richmond, Virginia
Goodman Allen Donnelly Norfolk, Virginia
Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Gordon Arata Montgomery Barnett New Orleans, Louisiana
HJM Asia Law & Co LLC Singapore, Singapore
HJM Asia Law & Co LLC Guangzhou, China
Kinnard, Clayton & Beveridge Nashville, Tennessee
Lipe Lyons Murphy Nahrstadt & Pontikis Ltd. Chicago, Illinois
Magleby Cataxinos & Greenwood Salt Lake City, Utah
Mandelbaum Salsburg P.C. Roseland, New Jersey
Mateer Harbert, P.A. Orlando, Florida
McKeen & Associates, P.C. Detroit, Michigan
Neil, Dymott, Frank, McCabe & Hudson APLC San Diego, California
Nicklaus & Associates, P.A. Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Nicklaus & Associates, P.A. Coral Gables, Florida
Nicklaus & Associates, P.A. Miami, Florida
Norchi Forbes, LLC Cleveland, Ohio
O'Meara, Leer, Wagner & Kohl, P.A. Eau Claire, Wisconsin
O'Meara, Leer, Wagner & Kohl, P.A. Minneapolis, Minnesota
Ogden & Sullivan, P.A. Tampa, Florida
Roeca Luria Shin LLP Honolulu, Hawaii
Rosen Hagood Charleston, South Carolina
Rosenblum Goldenhersh St. Louis, Missouri
Saalfield Shad, P.A. Jacksonville, Florida
Schneider Smeltz Spieth Bell LLP Cleveland, Ohio
Sklar Williams PLLC Las Vegas, Nevada
Smiling, Smiling & Burgess Tulsa, Oklahoma
Thomas Paschos & Associates, P.C. South Jersey
Thompson Miller & Simpson PLC Louisville, Kentucky
Thornton, Biechlin, Reynolds & Guerra, L.C. McAllen, Texas
Thornton, Biechlin, Reynolds & Guerra, L.C. San Antonio, Texas
Vatier Paris, France
Wharton Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC West Virginia
Wharton Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC Harrisonburg, Virginia
Wilke, Fleury, Hoffelt, Gould & Birney, LLP Sacramento, California

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Immigration Lawyers

The body of immigration law concerns the legal rights, duties, and obligations of aliens and foreign nationals who enter the country either on a permanent or temporary basis. Immigration law, also termed naturalization law, focuses on the application procedures associated with the naturalization process of foreign individuals who seek to establish U.S. citizenship, in addition to dealing with matters of people who illegally cross the U.S. border, foreign refugees or asylees, and those illegally transport foreign nationals into the U.S.

The main legislation governing immigration is the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, (INA). The act hads been amended numerous times, the most significant of which was the establishment of a new quota system in 1965. For INA purposes, an “alien” is any person who is not a citizen or a national of the United States. There are different categories of aliens: resident and nonresident, immigrant and nonimmigrant, documented and undocumented (“illegal” ).

Immigration law is under the control of Congress. Presidential power is limited to policies on refugees. Courts will not become involved in immigration issues unless constitutional rights are involved.

Several laws have been passed to strengthen regulation of illegal immigration practices, such as hiring of illegal aliens and sham marriages. Congress enacted the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) of 1986, which toughened criminal sanctions for employers who hire illegal aliens, denied illegal aliens federally funded welfare benefits, and legitimized some aliens through an amnesty program. The Immigration Marriage Fraud Amendments of 1986 attmepts to curb sham marriages for the sole purpose of obtaining citizenship.

Immigration policies are implemented by granting or denying visas. There are two types of visas: immigrant and nonimmigrant. Nonimmigrant visas are primary issued to tourists and temporary business visitors. Only a few categories of non-immigrant visas allow their holders work in the United States. Immigrant visas permit their holders to stay in the United States permanently and ultimately to apply for citizenship. An alien who has an immigrant visa is permitted to work in the United States. Congress limits the overall number of immigrant visas, and many immigrant visas are also subject to per-country caps.