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Member Firm Location
Ayres Carr & Sullivan, P.C. Indianapolis, Indiana
Barton LLP New York, New York
Broedermann Jahn Hamburg, Germany
Buchman Provine Brothers Smith LLP San Francisco, California
Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A. Phoenix, Arizona
Cacheaux Cavazos & Newton Reynosa, Mexico
Cacheaux Cavazos & Newton Matamoros, Mexico
Cacheaux Cavazos & Newton Monterrey, Mexico
Cacheaux Cavazos & Newton Queretaro, Mexico
Cacheaux Cavazos & Newton Ciudad Juarez, Mexico
Cacheaux Cavazos & Newton Mexico City, Mexico
Cacheaux Cavazos & Newton Tijuana, Mexico
Cacheaux, Cavazos & Newton Guadalajara, Mexico
Christian & Small LLP Birmingham, Alabama
Coughlin & Gerhart, LLP Binghamton, New York
Datsopoulos, MacDonald & Lind, P.C. Missoula, Montana
Dr. Fruhbeck Abogados Madrid, Spain
Dr. Fruhbeck Abogados Havana, Cuba
Earp Cohn P.C. Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Earp Cohn P.C. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Estrella, LLC Puerto Rico
Formosan Brothers Taipei, Taiwan
Fowler Bell PLLC Lexington, Kentucky
Fusthy & Manyai Law Office Budapest, Hungary
Greenberg Glusker Los Angeles, California
Guardia Montes & Asociados Costa Rica
Hanol Law Offices Seoul, South Korea
Hengtai Law Offices Shanghai, China
Hinkle Shanor LLP Artesia, New Mexico
Hinkle Shanor LLP Santa Fe, New Mexico
Hinkle Shanor LLP Roswell, New Mexico
Hinkle Shanor LLP Albuquerque, New Mexico
Horack, Talley, Pharr & Lowndes, P.A. Charlotte, North Carolina
James, Potts & Wulfers, Inc. Tulsa, Oklahoma
Kennerly, Montgomery & Finley, P.C. Knoxville, Tennessee
Koffman Kalef LLP Vancouver, Canada
Kohner, Mann & Kailas, S.C. Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Lambert Leser, P.C. Bay City, Michigan
Leonard, O'Brien, Spencer, Gale and Sayre, Ltd. Minneapolis, Minnesota
Mandelbaum Salsburg P.C. Roseland, New Jersey
Mateer Harbert, PA Orlando, Florida
MME Legal | Tax | Compliance Zurich, Switzerland
Montgomery Barnett, L.L.P. New Orleans, Louisiana
Montgomery Barnett, L.L.P. Baton Rouge, Louisiana
O'Donnell, Ferebee & Frazer, PC Houston, Texas
Prince Yeates Salt Lake City, Utah
Roe Cassidy Coates & Price, P.A. Greenville, South Carolina
Rosenblum Goldenhersh St. Louis, Missouri
Rosenthal, Monhait & Goddess, P.A. Wilmington, Delaware
Rothman Gordon Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Rudolph Friedmann LLP Boston, Massachusetts
Russell Advocaten B.V. Amsterdam, Netherlands
S Eshwar Consultants | House of Corporate & IPR Laws Chennai, India
Sader Law Firm, The Kansas City, Missouri
Smith Debnam Narron Drake Saintsing & Myers, LLP Raleigh, North Carolina
Spicer Rudstrom PLLC Nashville, Tennessee
Spicer Rudstrom PLLC Chattanooga, Tennessee
Timmins LLC Denver, Colorado
Trevett Cristo P.C. Rochester, New York
Vatier & Associes Paris, France
Wharton Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC West Virginia
Wharton Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC Harrisonburg, Virginia
Wilke, Fleury, Hoffelt, Gould & Birney, LLP Sacramento, California

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Bankruptcy Lawyers

The branch of bankruptcy law involves the procedure or legal method by which a debtor is relieved of financial liability for its debts by establishing court-approved reorganization plan or plan for partial repayment. The purposes of bankruptcy laws are to give honest, financially insolvent individuals and debtors of commercial enterprises relief from indebtedness. The two proceedings of bankruptcy include liquidation under Chapter 7 and debtor rehabilitation, or the process of planning reorganization and repayment of debts under Chapters 9, 11, 12 and 13.

Bankruptcy law is federal statutory law contained in Title 11 of the United States Code. Congress passed the Bankruptcy Code under its Constitutional grant of authority to “establish. . . uniform laws on the subject of Bankruptcy throughout the United States.” See U.S. Constitution Article I, Section 8. States may not regulate bankruptcy though they may pass laws that govern other aspects of the debtor-creditor relationship. A number of sections of Title 11 incorporate the debtor-creditor law of the individual states.

Bankruptcy proceedings are conducted in the United States Bankruptcy Courts. These courts are a branch of the District Courts of The United States. The United States Trustees were established by Congress to handle many of the supervisory and administrative duties of bankruptcy proceedings. Proceedings in bankruptcy courts are governed by the Bankruptcy Rules which were promulgated by the Supreme Court under the authority of Congress.

A bankruptcy proceeding can either be entered into voluntarily by a debtor or initiated by creditors. After a bankruptcy proceeding is filed, creditors generally may not seek to collect their debts outside of the proceeding. The debtor is not allowed to transfer property that has been declared part of the estate subject to proceedings. Furthermore, certain pre-proceeding transfers of property, secured interests, and liens may be delayed or invalidated. Various provisions of the Bankruptcy Code also establish the priority of creditors’ interests.

There are two basic types of Bankruptcy proceedings. A filing under Chapter 7 is called liquidation. It is the most common type of bankruptcy proceeding. Liquidation involves the appointment of a trustee who collects the non-exempt property of the debtor, sells it and distributes the proceeds to the creditors. Not dischargeable in bankruptcy are alimony and child support, taxes, and fraudulent transactions. Filing a bankruptcy petition automatically suspends all existing legal actions and is often used to forestall foreclosure or imposition of judgment. After 45 or more days a creditor with a debt secured by real or personal property can petition the court to have the “automatic stay” of legal rights removed and a foreclosure to proceed. When the court formally declares a party as a bankrupt, a party cannot file for bankruptcy again for nine years.

Chapter 11 bankruptcy allows a business to reorganize and refinance to be able to prevent final insolvency. Often there is no trustee, but a “debtor in possession,” and considerable time to present a plan of reorganization. The final plan often requires creditors to take only a small percentage of the debts owed them or to take payment over a long period of time. Chapter 13 is similar to Chapter 11, but is for individuals to work out payment schedules.