International Society of Primerus Law Firms

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Member Firm Location
Atkin Winner & Sherrod Las Vegas, Nevada
Ayres Carr & Sullivan, P.C. Indianapolis, Indiana
Barcellos Tucunduva Advogados Sao Paulo, Brazil
Barton LLP New York, New York
Bennett Law Firm, P.A., The New Hampshire
Bennett Law Firm, P.A., The Maine
Bivins & Hemenway, P. A. Tampa, Florida
Brody Wilkinson PC Fairfield County, CT
Broedermann Jahn Hamburg, Germany
Buchman Provine Brothers Smith LLP San Francisco, California
Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A. Phoenix, Arizona
Cacheaux Cavazos & Newton Matamoros, Mexico
Cacheaux Cavazos & Newton Monterrey, Mexico
Cacheaux Cavazos & Newton Ciudad Juarez, Mexico
Cacheaux Cavazos & Newton Queretaro, Mexico
Cacheaux Cavazos & Newton Mexico City, Mexico
Cacheaux Cavazos & Newton Reynosa, Mexico
Cacheaux Cavazos & Newton Tijuana, Mexico
Cacheaux, Cavazos & Newton Guadalajara, Mexico
Carroll & O'Dea Sydney, Australia
Christian & Small LLP Birmingham, Alabama
Coleman & Horowitt, LLP Fresno, California
Collins & Lacy, P.C. Columbia, South Carolina
Demorest Law Firm, PLLC Royal Oak, Michigan
Demorest Law Firm, PLLC Detroit, Michigan
Demorest Law Firm, PLLC Dearborn, Michigan
Diamond Law Attorneys George Town Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands
Downs ♦ Stanford, P.C. Austin, Texas
Downs ♦ Stanford, P.C. Dallas, Texas
FDL, Studio Legale e Tributario Milan, Italy
Ferris & Britton, A Professional Corporation San Diego, California
Foland, Wickens, Eisfelder, Roper & Hofer, P.C. Kansas City, Missouri
Formosan Brothers Taipei, Taiwan
Fowler Bell PLLC Lexington, Kentucky
Fusthy & Manyai Law Office Budapest, Hungary
Ganfer & Shore, LLP New York, New York
Giwa-Osagie & Company Ikoyi, Nigeria
Hanol Law Offices Seoul, South Korea
Hengtai Law Offices Shanghai, China
HHG Legal Group Perth, Australia
Hodkin Law Group, P.A. Boca Raton, Florida
Johnson, Graffe, Keay, Moniz & Wick, LLP Seattle, Washington
Johnson, Graffe, Keay, Moniz & Wick, LLP Tacoma, Washington
JustLaw Bangalore Karnataka, India
Kennerly, Montgomery & Finley, P.C. Knoxville, Tennessee
Koffman Kalef LLP Vancouver, Canada
Kohner, Mann & Kailas, S.C. Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Krevolin & Horst, LLC Atlanta, Georgia
Lane & Lane, LLC Chicago, Illinois
Lipe Lyons Murphy Nahrstadt & Pontikis, Ltd. Chicago, Illinois
Mandelbaum Salsburg P.C. Roseland, New Jersey
Marriott Harrison LLP London, United Kingdom
Mateer Harbert, PA Orlando, Florida
MME Legal | Tax | Compliance Zurich, Switzerland
Montgomery Barnett, L.L.P. New Orleans, Louisiana
Montgomery Barnett, L.L.P. Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Navinlaw Bangkok
Neil, Dymott, Frank, McFall, Trexler, McCabe & Hudson APLC San Diego, California
Nicklaus & Associates, P.A. Miami, Florida
Nicklaus & Associates, P.A. Coral Gables, Florida
Njoroge Regeru & Company Kenya
Ogborn Mihm LLP Denver, Colorado
Ogden & Sullivan, P.A. Tampa, Florida
ONC Lawyers Hong Kong, Hong Kong (SAR)
O'Meara, Leer, Wagner & Kohl, P.A. Eau Claire, Wisconsin
O'Meara, Leer, Wagner & Kohl, P.A. Minneapolis, Minnesota
Pinilla Gonzalez & Prieto Abogados Bogota, Colombia
Prince Yeates Salt Lake City, Utah
Quijano & Associates Belize District, Belize
Quijano & Associates Road Town, Tortola , British Virgin Islands
Quijano & Associates Panama City, Panama
Refalo & Zammit Pace Advocates Malta
Roe Cassidy Coates & Price, P.A. Greenville, South Carolina
Roeca Luria Hiraoka LLP Honolulu, Hawaii
Rosen Hagood Charleston, South Carolina
Rosenthal, Monhait & Goddess, P.A. Wilmington, Delaware
Rothman Gordon Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Rudolph Friedmann LLP Boston, Massachusetts
Russell Advocaten B.V. Amsterdam, Netherlands
S Eshwar Consultants | House of Corporate & IPR Laws Chennai, India
Seth Dua & Associates Noida, India
Seth Dua & Associates New Delhi, India
Smiling, Smiling & Burgess Tulsa, Oklahoma
Smith Debnam Narron Drake Saintsing & Myers, LLP Raleigh, North Carolina
Spicer Rudstrom PLLC Nashville, Tennessee
Spicer Rudstrom PLLC Chattanooga, Tennessee
Spicer Rudstrom PLLC Memphis, Tennessee
Szilagyi & Daly Hartford, Connecticut
Timmins LLC Denver, Colorado
Trevett Cristo P.C. Rochester, New York
Vatier & Associes Paris, France
Vukmir & Associates Croatia
Watts, Donovan & Tilley, P.A. Little Rock, Arkansas
Wharton Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC West Virginia
Wharton Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC Harrisonburg, Virginia
Wilke, Fleury, Hoffelt, Gould & Birney, LLP Sacramento, California
WINHELLER Attorneys at Law & Tax Advisors Frankfurt
Zupkus & Angell, P.C. Denver, Colorado

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ADR Lawyers

Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) is an approach or means for resolving disputes outside the judicial system of state or federal courts, commonly in the form of arbitration or mediation. Mediation is considered among the less formal alternatives to litigation that involves a panel or impartial third party (typically consisting of a group of qualified attorneys or retired judges experienced in negotiations) that intervenes to reach a settlement of the dispute.


Arbitration is the procedure by which parties agree to submit their disputes to an independent neutral third party, known as an arbitrator, who considers arguments and evidence from both sides, then hands down a final and binding decision. This alternative, which can be used to adjudicate business-to-business, business-to-employee, or business-to-customer disputes, can utilize a permanent arbitrator, an independent arbitrator selected by the two parties to resolve a particular grievance, or an arbitrator selected through the procedures of the AAA or FMCS. A board of arbitrators can also be used in a hearing.

Other forms of arbitration include the following:

  • Expedited arbitration is a process intended to speed up the arbitration process with an informal hearing. Under this process, decisions are generally rendered within five days. It was first used in 1971 in settling disputes in the steel industry.
  • Interest arbitration is the use of an arbitrator or board of arbitrators to render a binding decision in resolving a dispute over new contract terms.
  • Final offer selection arbitration is an interest arbitration process in which the arbitrator or board of arbitrators selects either the union or management proposal to the solution. There can be no compromised decisions. This process is also termed either-or arbitration.
  • Tripartite arbitration is a process wherein a three-member panel of arbitrators is used to reach a decision. Both labor and management select an arbitrator and the third is selected by the other two arbitrators or the parties to the dispute as a neutral participant.

In contrast to arbitration, mediation is a process whereby the parties involved utilize an outside party to help them reach a mutually agreeable settlement. Rather than dictate a solution to the dispute between labor and management, the mediator—who maintains scrupulous neutrality throughout—suggests various proposals to help the two parties reach a mutually agreeable solution. In mediation, the various needs of the conflicting sides of an issue are identified, and ideas and concepts are exchanged until a viable solution is proposed by either of the parties or the mediator. Rarely does the mediator exert pressure on either party to accept a solution. Instead, the mediator’s role is to encourage clear communication and compromise in order to resolve the dispute. The terms “arbitration” and “mediation” are sometimes used interchangeably, but this mixing of terminology is careless and inaccurate. While the mediator suggests possible solutions to the disputing parties, the arbitrator makes a final decision on the labor dispute which is binding on the parties.

Mediation can be a tremendously effective tool in resolving disputes without destroying business relationships. It allows parties to work toward a resolution out of the public eye (the courts) without spending large sums on legal expenses. Its precepts also ensure that a company will not become trapped in a settlement that it finds unacceptable (unlike an arbitration decision that goes against the company). But Hayford commented that “mediation only works when the parties employing it are willing to go all out in the attempt to achieve settlement,” and he warned that “the mediator must be selected carefully, with an eye toward the critical attributes of neutrality, subject matter and process expertise, and previous track record.” Finally, he noted that with mediation, there is a “lack of finality inherent in a voluntary, conciliation-based procedure.”

Other forms of mediation often employed in labor disputes include “grievance mediation” and “preventive mediation.” Grievance mediation is an attempt to ward off arbitration through a course of fact-finding that is ultimately aimed at promoting dialogue between the two parties. Preventive mediation dates to the Taft-Hartley Act (1947) and is an FMCS program intended to avoid deeper divisions between labor and management over labor issues. Also termed technical assistance, the program encompasses training, education, consultation, and analysis of union-management disputes.