International Society of Primerus Law Firms

Probate Law Firms

Probate Law Firm Directory

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Firm NameCityState
Christian & Small LLP Birmingham Alabama
Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A. Phoenix Arizona
Atchley, Russell, Waldrop & Hlavinka, LLP Texarkana Arkansas
Coleman & Horowitt, LLP Fresno California
Greenberg Glusker Los Angeles California
Wilke, Fleury, Hoffelt, Gould & Birney, LLP Sacramento California
Neil, Dymott, Frank, McFall, Trexler, McCabe & Hudson APLC San Diego California
Buchman Provine Brothers Smith LLP San Francisco California
Sparks Willson Borges Brandt & Johnson, PC Colorado Springs Colorado
Timmins LLC Denver Colorado
Brody Wilkinson PC Fairfield County Connecticut
Hodkin Law Group, P.A. Boca Raton Florida
Widerman Malek, P.L. Daytona Beach Florida
Widerman Malek, P.L. Melbourne Florida
Mateer Harbert, PA Orlando Florida
Bivins & Hemenway, P. A. Tampa Florida
Ayres Carr & Sullivan, P.C. Indianapolis Indiana
Carney Appleby Law Cedar Rapids Iowa
Carney Appleby Law Davenport Iowa
Carney Appleby Law Des Moines Iowa
Carney Appleby Law Iowa City Iowa
Montgomery Barnett, L.L.P. Baton Rouge Louisiana
Montgomery Barnett, L.L.P. New Orleans Louisiana
Rudolph Friedmann LLP Boston Massachusetts
Lambert Leser, P.C. Bay City Michigan
Datsopoulos, MacDonald & Lind, P.C. Missoula Montana
Mandelbaum Salsburg P.C. Roseland New Jersey
Coughlin & Gerhart, LLP Binghamton New York
Horack, Talley, Pharr & Lowndes, P.A. Charlotte North Carolina
Schneider Smeltz Spieth Bell LLP Cleveland Ohio
Fogg Law Firm Oklahoma City Oklahoma
James, Potts & Wulfers, Inc. Tulsa Oklahoma
Rosen Hagood Charleston South Carolina
Spicer Rudstrom PLLC Chattanooga Tennessee
Spicer Rudstrom PLLC Nashville Tennessee
Shaw Cowart LLP Austin Texas
Moses, Palmer & Howell, L.L.P. Fort Worth Texas
O'Donnell, Ferebee & Frazer, PC Houston Texas
Atchley, Russell, Waldrop & Hlavinka, LLP Texarkana Texas
Prince Yeates Salt Lake City Utah
Wharton Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC Harrisonburg Virginia
Beresford Booth PLLC Edmonds Washington
Menzer Law Firm, PLLC Seattle Washington
Wharton Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC West Virginia
Firm NameCityCountry
Carroll & O'Dea Lawyers Sydney Australia
Firm NameCityCountry
WINHELLER Attorneys at Law & Tax Advisors Frankfurt am Main Germany
Firm NameCityCountry
ONC Lawyers Hong Kong Hong Kong (SAR)
Firm NameCityCountry
Fusthy & Manyai Law Office Budapest Hungary

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Probate Law

Probate the process of proving a will is valid and thereafter administering the estate of a dead person according to the terms of the will. It is a judicial act or determination of a court having competent jurisdiction establishing the validity of a will. First the will is filed with the clerk of the appropriate court in the county where the deceased person lived, along with a petition to have the court approve the will and appoint the executor named in the will (or if none is available, an administrator) with a declaration of a person who had signed the will as a witness. If the court determines the will is valid, the court then “admits” the will to probate.

Probate is a general term for the entire process of administration of estates of dead persons, including those without wills, with court supervision. The initial step in the process is proving a will is valid and then administering the estate of a dead person according to the terms of the will. The will must be filed with the clerk of the appropriate court in the county where the deceased person lived, along with a petition to have the court approve the will and appoint the executor named in the will. If an executor is not named in the will, an administrator is appointed. A declaration of a person who had signed the will as a witness is also filed. If the court determines the will is valid, the court then “admits” the will to probate.

Even if there is a will, probate may not be necessary if the estate is worth no more than a stated dollar value or is small with no real estate title to be transferred or all of the estate is either jointly owned or community property. The probate process involves fees set by statute and/or the court (depending on state laws) for attorneys, executors and administrators, the need to publish notices, court hearings, paperwork, the public nature of the proceedings and delays while waiting for creditors to file claims, whether money was owed or not.